Tag Archives: paleo

Weekly Round Up

30 Apr

Topics, links and comments from this week’s HBP discussions.

Jan's favorite fish.

Avocado oil may improve blood lipids.

The liver tells all and reveals much about fat.

How many calories to you burn using a standing desk? 

A Paleo food truck is in the works. Show your support people!

Russ's pho!

Fatty food’s link to marital stress?  Of course we’ve seen just the opposite here. 

A nice submission to the NY Times’ Ethical Meat Eating contest.

Helminths for allergic rhinitis.

Screwing up the environment is Paleo. Or at least we’ve been doing it for a very long time. 

Another rebuttal to the latest anti-meat arguments.

Interesting connection between niacin and obesity.  Paul Jaminet adds to the discussion here. 

Derrick's hardcore stew of beef bones, beef heart, assorted shellfish, bone stock and other thangs.

Men’s grooming products can be pretty uncomfortable. 

Fasting’s beneficial effects on cancer treatment.

Round 2 of HBP -Cook-off closes Friday, May 4th. The rules are as follows:  Protein: ground meat (does not have to be beef) 3 veggies: three different colors, starch is up to you if you choose to do one or not – also totally open, rice, potato – safe starches! 3 Spices only. More here.

Results of Biggest Loser regimen on participants’ metabolisms.

How vegetable oils replaced animal fats.

Julia's San Diego trip featured some tasty food.

The mental effects of supplementing with DHA alone.

Chocolate has many special benefits- science says so!

 Chris Kresser continues with his salt series. 

Get your Gluten Free Coconut Cake recipe here!

Mash's Saturday night spread.

Weekly Round Up

16 Apr

We got all discussy this past week. Here are some links and food photos to whet your appetites!

Jan's Finnish whitefish caviar with shitakes.

Higher levels of PCBs in organic milk when compared to conventional milk.

Underground Wellness featured Dr. Tery Wahls.

Shift work and it’s effects on diabetes risk. 

Coffee’s effects on adipokines, liver function, triglycerides and LDL.

Connection between blood levels of some of the phthalates and increased prevalence of diabetes, even after adjusting for obesity, blood lipids, smoking, and exercise habits.

Vitacost promotes “eating like a caveman” in their latest newsletter!

Jan wins "Mr. Paleo 2012".

Chris Kresser tackles salt in his latest series of blog posts.

Riiiiight. The obesity epidemic is a simple math problem!

Mel HGL serves up a post that covers the traditional use of cold therapy.

Perhaps the best weight loss article ever written?

Humans apparently evolved the ability to produce omega 3 and 6 fats to feed our brainz. But in today’s world this may serve as a mismatch and is prolly royally screwing us up!

Chronic dieting isn’t doing very much good for our waste lines.

Russ's colcannon with just a smidge too many leeks - but he thinks onions are gross anyway.

Paindatabase.com urges us to stop all the negative thinking!

Fecal transplants may sound downright horrid, but if you’ve got a case of C. diff you just may want to seek out a healthy poo donor.

The BBC covers the revival of fermenting foods.

Jarred baby food is pretty devoid of nutrients. 

Honey’s effect on human evolution.

FED features a comprehensive post about the merits of cooking in human evolution.  

Notes from Andrew,  our resident Bastyr Doctor of Naturopathic medicine student:

  •  Chamomile (matricaria recuita) is kind of amazing. It’s the most potent herbal nervine known. It contains matricine which get converted in the gut to chamazulene. Chamazulene powerfully stops the conversation of arachidonic acid (a major source of oxidation) and inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (think low, low dose aspirin). Chamomile alo contains apigenin which reduces DNA oxidation, is chemoprotective, and induces apoptosis. Squiterpense give chamomile it’s bitter taste which stimulate cranial nerve 9 and 10 causing an increasing in stomach acid, salivation, and peristalsis. Many of these benefits are in the volatile oils of chamomile so teas must be covered as they steep otherwise the volatile oils will evaporate. If your chamomile isn’t slightly bitter, find a brand that hasn’t bred the medicinal qualities out of their chamomile.
  • Also, how to make the computer less addicting at night. control + option + command + 8 Try it out.

Jenny decided that Saturday nights are perfect for boning.

Weekly Round Up

8 Apr

What kind of krazy krap do we talk about in the HBP discussion group you ask? Here you go. You asked for it!

Amanda's amazing pork loin with spicy cranberry for $2.50 a serving!

Some beautiful food art for sale.

We all KNOW it’s an important topic, so here’s another piece about how maternal diet affects the health of babies.

Lustig was on 60 Minutes this week, and Alan Aragon responds!

Can mummies reveal the secrets to cure obesity?

Curious about what varying body fat levels actually look like? You may be surprised about what you find most attractive.

For the lacto-Paleos. Greek yogurt, strawberries.raspberries.blueberries., a bit o maple syrup.

Girls are cool and strong!

Researchers identify distinct metabolic responses to high & low GI carbohydrates in healthy, non-obese individual.

Superhuman Radio was a biggie for us this week with two Paleo interviews. Paul Jaminet gives another great interview and so does Robb Wolf .

Carly's cottage pie.

Is the U.S. obesity epidemic even greater than reported?

Julia's scallops!

Here’s a new and interesting egg recipe by The Domestic Man!

Saccharomyces boulardii is a beneficial strain of yeast, a probiotic, that appears to be medicinal.

An enzyme in saliva helps regulate blood glucose.

Amanda's crab cakes (ever need some Paleo catering? HBP cooks are amazing!)

“A secret of our industrial food system is that it pumps chickens with arsenic, caffeine, Benadryl and Tylenol — even illegal antibiotics.”

Robb Wolf has a great, tear jerking post on his blog.

Japan’s new love affair with wheat. 

J. Stanton posts a good read about nutritionism. 

Jan's Finnish herrings.

Monsanto threatens to sue Vermont?

Evidence that humans used fire 1 million years ago. 

Taurine is good. It prevents heart disease (in amounts you would get in your diet and not super dosing with pillz). A possible mechanism is that taurine inhibits non-enzymatic glycation and lipid peroxidation. 

Melissa McEwan’s part deux of her evolutionary biology series. 

Jan's Oxtail.

Antibiotics effect gut flora which screw up your vitamin producing bacteria, and more in this post by Dr. Ayers. 

Denise Minger’s adds a section to her blog just for vegans. Very helpful and interesting.

Interesting paper on the effects of saturated fats vs n-6 PUFA on liver fat. 

FED takes on Self Determination Theory.

Does Yerba Mate fix your funky leptin?

Weekly Round Up

26 Mar

Here’s a sampling of just a few of the things we’ve discussed in the HBP group this week, oh yeah, plus some food porn:

Londoner Carly's lunch: Smoked bacon with homemade guacamole.

Matthew says, “I don’t have a problem with any of these foods and its great to make tasty gluten free stuff if people want it. It just doesn’t have anything much to do with how our ancestors ate and is probably quite capable of tripping out your food reward circuits,” in reference to this post.

Use your slow cooker to combat chronic pain!

Elizabeth shares the fact that 110 new fake meat products were introduced in 2010/11.

Matthew might be a student bachelor, but he sure doesn't eat like one!

Mash wants to start a barefoot running program. We gathered some great tips and fails: start slowly, consider minimalist runners instead of going fully bare and run on just grass or sand first.

The New York Times hosted an essay contest titled, “Tell Us Why it’s Ethical to eat Meat.” Our rants are just too long to post here, but rest assured, we tossed this one about.

Matthew shares this novel therapy, CLA for Crohn’s disease.

Mal shares this Suppversity article that delves into some of the possible mechanisms for why gastric bypass surgery has such powerful metabolic effects, and how you can perhaps mimic these results through diet, (hint…GLP-1).

Pat's fish head stock.

Lucas shares some interesting findings about the effects of music on the brain.

A new blog with but one post, but a good read: The Leptin Marketing Miracle.

The BBC aired a special titled “The Truth About Fat” for those not in the UK you can see it on YouTube.

Andrew has been planning this treat all week. He didn't get sick, but overall it was meh.

Our supplement fetishist club led by Stabby endorses Astaxanthin! Just 2mg are shown to have benefit.

Dr. BG talks about the effect that pesticides has on our mitochondria, which we should ALL know by now are those little energy producing organelles.

Giulia shares the four things you should never buy at Costco.  Bad news folks, shrimp tops the list.

Lamb shanks.

JuBa has a new web presence that she launched this week.

Russ composed a great post right here on this blog about the difference between “being” Paleo and eating Paleo.

Devika shares some good news regarding red meat and depression.

Russ's BBQ setup. Catching the goodness of drippings.

What? Popcorn has more polyphenols than fruits and vegetables?

This Friday, March 30th is our group’s deadline for submitting our first HBP Iron Chef Paleo Challenge. This round we must use egg, kale, mushrooms, onions and a tuber. No more than three unpowered kitchen gadgets and no more than three seasonings. Future rounds to be announced via our facebook page and here. Be on the lookout because we are looking for submissions from outside of the group!

Bree's eats up some birds (duck). She better be saving that rendered fat!

The Difference Between Eating Paleo and “Being Paleo”

23 Mar

As the Paleo FX Ancestral Momentum – Theory to Practice Symposium (so glad they didn’t go with the long version of the event’s name) wound down last week, it felt like the Paleo blogging world and its faithful audience (hereafter “Paleosphere”) had worked itself up into a frenzy. Over what, I’m not quite sure. It may have just been the gathering of like-minded individuals with strong online presences. What left a lasting impression was the tone of the Paleosphere during the event, and it just so happened that the timely coalescence of Paleo personalities and its ensuing social media onslaught brought everything to a head for me.

You see, I’ve been following a Paleo way of eating for about 18 months now, and it’s had a profound impact on the way I view the world, how I feel, and (obviously) how I eat. I replaced most grains, dairy, legumes, refined sugars, and seed-derived oils with whole foods and many of my autoimmune symptoms went into remission. I can honestly say with conviction that I “eat Paleo”. However, I do not identify myself as “being Paleo”. I think there’s a distinction that needs to be made before we move on.

To me, “being Paleo” means that you are self-identifying with a group. It’s like calling yourself a musician or a video gamer (as opposed to simply writing music or playing video games). The problem with identification is that disidentification – the mentality of “us vs. them”, and a focus on what you are NOT – often emerges. Consider the in-group-out-group bias. This phenomenon can lead to aggression and prejudice, and some suggest that it leads to a lack of productivity, as identifiers take action while disidentifiers tend to just make a lot of talk. (And who is the “them” in this case? Just about everyone else – those pesky grain-eaters that make up the rest of the population, and those cursed Vegans that try and muck everything up!).

While the Paleosphere (thankfully) doesn’t focus too much on the “them” aspect of the diet, there’s definitely an overbearing “us” momentum that isn’t entirely healthy, either. I often see the Paleosphere as being on this slippery slope towards extremism.

As an ever-increasingly-large group of people that eat a similar diet and in many cases hold similar values, I think it’s important we don’t lose sight of the fact that extremists and ideologists often alienate themselves from the rest of society. How are we supposed to make an impact on the nutrition world if we work the Paleosphere up into a frenzied cult status? John George and Laird Wilcox, scholars of fringe movements, have identified the following characteristics of political extremists and ideological contrarians:

1. Absolute certainty they have the truth.
2. [The belief that] America is controlled to a greater or lesser extent by a conspiratorial group. In fact, they believe this evil group is very powerful and controls most nations.
3. Open hatred of opponents. Because these opponents (actually “enemies” in the extremists’ eyes) are seen as a part of or sympathizers with “The Conspiracy,” they deserve hatred and contempt.
4. Little faith in the democratic process. Mainly because most believe “The Conspiracy” has great influence in the U.S. government, and therefore extremists usually spurn compromise.
5. Willingness to deny basic civil liberties to certain fellow citizens, because enemies deserve no liberties.
6. Consistent indulgence in irresponsible accusations and character assassination.

Does that sound alarmingly familiar to you? Admittedly, the above characteristics have a major political slant, and the fact that big corporations have major influence on what ends up on our dinner plates may not lead to some of those characteristics (like the willingness to deny basic civil liberties part).

I can’t deny that a relatively extreme diet (side note: it’s sad that the Paleo diet is considered “extreme” in this age of processed/fast foods) will attract people that gravitate towards fringe thinking – as sociologist Daniel Bell put it, for those on the fringe, “the way you hold beliefs is more important than what you hold. If somebody’s been a rigid Communist, he becomes a rigid anti-Communist – the rigidity being constant.” How many ex-Vegans are in the Paleosphere? Lots. (As some would argue: not enough.) An extreme lifestyle will attract extremists, which simply isn’t preventable. My point is this: just because there are crazies in the Paleosphere, we don’t have to listen to them, and we need to keep ourselves in check to make sure we don’t become them. An easy way to prevent this is to continually challenge ourselves to question our dietary standards, and to avoid dogmatism.

So where do we start? How can we make sure that we promote this diet in the most open, pragmatic, unobtrusive, and inclusive way? Here are some quick suggestions:

1. Don’t tell people that you “are Paleo”. Hell, don’t even tell them that you eat “Paleo”, because the use of labels is in itself exclusionary. Just tell them what you eat, and maybe what you don’t eat. It doesn’t need to be more complicated than that. Look at the Weston A. Price dietary guidelines. It’s very similar to the modern interpretation of the Paleo diet, and they don’t tell you what to avoid, even once. Focus on the whole foods, not on yet-to-be-completely-proven-as-evil grains, legumes, etc.

2. Don’t use flawed ideas or gray areas to promote the diet, because it calls the Paleosphere’s credibility into question. Don’t worship bacon, which is likely not good for you, even if it is (was) somewhat fashionable to “baconize” stuff. It’s a useful ingredient in cooking, but it’s not our flagship food. Don’t celebrate “Paleo versions” of sweets like Paleo brownies because that’s not helping people overcome their underlying food issues and if anything it’s guiding them towards failure. The last thing we should do is to set people on shaky foundations. Personally, I’m all about Dr. Kurt Harris‘ incremental process, because it encourages folks to improve their health even when they’re not ready to dive into a full-blown Paleo eating orgy.

3. Avoid dogmatic thinking. Are potatoes evil? What about white rice? What about dairy? Aren’t we supposed to be eating low carb? Remember that human variance, health history, and gut flora are major factors in food tolerance, and macronutrient ratios are highly individualized. This diet is ever-changing (and it should be as scientific study helps enlighten our views on nutrition every day); be open to suggestion.

4. Try not to alienate others by flaunting an overbearing self-identification of “being Paleo.” You’re not a caveman, and you’re certainly not living like one, so why label yourself as one? If anything, I suggest embracing what we do have in common with our ancestors – the fact that we’re all on this planet. Go take a walk/hike. Watch a sunset. Spend a few days camping. That’s certainly closer to being a caveman than eating a pound of lean red meat straight out of a slow cooker after a hard day at the office and then blogging about it.

5. Bear in mind that everyone has their own burden. I’m pretty sure that most people simply cannot afford to eat fresh organic vegetables and grass-fed meats all the time. My family can’t afford it, despite the fact that a huge chunk of our income goes towards our groceries – nearly twice as much as before we switched our diet. Additionally, many people don’t have the resources to find out whether or not they have access to affordable grass-fed meats anyway – online resources are often outdated, and I’ll wager that many excellent farmers are out working and not updating their farm’s webpage and social networking fan pages. Many don’t have access to local, affordable health food markets. This is no reason to make people feel bad for having to make sacrifices to make ends meat meet; instead celebrate the steps that people are willing to take for their health that are within their means.

6. Avoid the fringe, and consider the power of prudence. What is the point of wearing t-shirts that say “Meat is awesome” or “Vegans suck”? Before shouting from the rooftops about how stuff like cold thermogenesis and eating butter straight out of the container is awesome, take a step back and think about how crazy that sounds to the average person. I’m not saying that any of those extreme elements are bad, but they might not be helping the Paleo movement along when that’s the stuff we get identified with. When it comes down to it, who better to police the Paleosphere than ourselves?

Lastly, please don’t take this as an insult to anyone that’s exhibited these behaviors. Dramatically improving your health through simple changes in diet is awesome, and exciting. I don’t fault you for telling people that “you’re Paleo”. My only purpose in writing this article is to help consider the fact that we need to do what we can to impact those that aren’t lucky enough to know much about sensible eating yet. As much as it may be fun to be part of a cool, elite club of Paleo dieters that share cool pictures and sayings amongst themselves, isn’t our energy better spent on refining the diet itself through scientific study and attracting people that haven’t been exposed to the diet yet?

Weekly Round Up

12 Mar

In between ice baths and 9 egg omelette breakfasts, we managed to talk about the following this week in …HIGHBROW PALEO.

Patty pesto peas plantains piquant... primal

Marissa wrote a great blog post about epigenetics and urban planning.

Stabby says, “Otzi ate a lot of grains. Otzi suffered from a lot of infections. Otzi is one confounded mfer. I wouldn’t use Otzi to say anything about anything, even grains or infections because it could be all the grains or all the infections.  Invalid inference!!!!!!!! Mainstream media Y U so suck?” in reference to this article.

Speaking of Stabby, that raccoon has one hell of a crush on Byron Richards, from wellnessresources.com. Here’s his take on the supplement pantethine. It’s great for mellowing out acne (especially the hormonal kind), raises BDNF which is like youth serum for da brainz, and enhanes GI tract healing.

Apparently this piece of awkward weirdness was making the rounds on the interwebs.

Roasted curry chicken drumsticks, served with an arugula salad.

Rose shares this neat bit of information that goes into how food reward varies in obese and non obese people. Rose says, “It looks like this is saying that obese people responded differently to both hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic conditions than non-obese people with regard to (drum roll) FOOD REWARD. Non-obese subjects (in my reading) showed satiety and noninterest in food when blood sugar is high, while obese people did not have that prefront restraint system activation. And obese subjects reacted more to hypoglycemia as well, although I can’t tell exactly what those brain functions indicate about that reaction.”

Mallory shares this link which covers how omega -3 fish oil benefits thyroid function.

We listened to Jimmy Moore’s interview with Loren Cordain. Overall (sorry Paleo gods) we were a little “meh” about it. Andrew summed it up nicely for us when he commented: “Paleo logic for avoiding all foods #1: A subset of the population is intolerant to a food so nobody should eat it.”

Yahoo deems Paleo a celeb diet to avoid!  Tony give them the FED treatment.

Y'all HAVE to visit Tony's site. So good! (click the piture please).

Dudes – Stabby wants you to know that your high protein diet must ALSO be high FAT. Here’s why.

The list of presenters for the 2012 Ancestral Health Symposium is up! Get ready people. It’s going to be on like Donkey….nevermind.

Kent's new love - Japanese sweets. #worklunch

Russ shares that smoothies are totally PALEO! Yay! (Since the coffee news from last week was so devastating).

Andrew comments that Matt Stone may be on to something with this whole “don’t drink the water” stuff. He was interviewed on UG Wellness recently here.

Ned Kock shares more in his series about gaining muscle and losing fat at the same time.

Mary shares this study which covers the important link between insulin resistance and depression among teens.

Finally, this satirical post pokes fun at the nutrional cult that is Paleo.  So funny!

Hello. I'm a nice snack. Sheep's-milk yogurt, maple syrup, berries, edible pansies.

Weekly Round Up

5 Feb

Here’s a condensed version of the goings on in the Highbrow Paleo discussion group. Links, topics, pictures, you name it:

Matthew's coconut Banana Cakes

Andrew is cutting out coffee for the month of February, and here is what we learned: Cutting coffee cold turkey can be difficult but not impossible, Jan, our Finnish friend hails from the country with the highest coffee intake, and Greatist shared why coffee and tea are good for you in this infographic.

We LOVE Tony’s virtual paleo cookbook. Amanda loves the eggplant fries.

Matthew started a new blog and shared this recipe for coconut banana cakes. Julie runs with her bad self and tweaks the recipe to come up with coconut banana chocolate chip cookies. If we’re nice maybe she’ll copy down the recipe for the Eats section.

Julie's cookie version of Matthew's coconut cakes.

Crazy ass featherless chickens that do not need to be plucked are NOT paleo!

The Fuck?

Matt Metzgar posted about the effect eating in front of the computer has on overeating later in the day. It looks like many of us are guilty of this, however those who plan their meals and control their portions don’t see this as a problem for them. Maybe the planning is a form of front end mindfulness.

We talked about Paul Jaminet’s post on Carbohydrate levels. In the end a few of us continue to be macronutrient agnostic, while doing our best to avoid NADs and be nutrient replete.

Amanda shared this nifty NY Times blog post about the effects exercise has on autophagy.

Russ wonders what we feed our pets? Are they Paleo too? Russ buys Blue Wilderness, Fazila has a herd of cats and she likes Origen, Taste of the Wild, and Feline Caviar. Some do feed their animals a raw diet of bones, offal and meat. Some are happy getting the best kibble they can get while supplementing it with eggs and meat from time to time.

If you could go on a long vacation (4 months) to top off your vitamin D reserves, where would you go? We recommend: Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Thailand, Indonesia, East Malaysia or Belize.

Thailand ::dreams::

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