Paleo Marketing 101: How people make money using shameless megadoses of self-promotion

15 Aug

Hi! Kamal here, with some commentary about the business of paleo. There are only two kinds of people in this world: those that make a living off of paleo, and those that don’t. An increasing number of people in the latter camp want to get into the former camp. In the past year, several paleo books have cracked the top 10 nutrition best-sellers on Amazon. It’s a good time to get in the game.

Do you want to cash-in on the “paleo” concept? If so, I’ve got just one question for you: how good are you at schmoozing?

Don’t hate the player, hate the game

The paleo industry isn’t quite like big pharma, tobacco, or oil. It’s an industry where the “leaders” often got there because they discovered substantial health benefits from this way of eating and living. Enthusiasm for nutrition can lead to desire to help others, and the natural desire to make a living off of it. Heck, I briefly considered this path to help pay the rent during my nutrition PhD program, until I realized how bad I suck at networking. Although the market for “paleo” isn’t greasy and disconcerting like the aforementioned industries, you should follow these steps if you want to succeed.

Step 1: Make friends in high places

See this list here? Make at least two friends from people in the top ten of the list. The list is old and subject to change. For example, Paul Jaminet was busy writing a book, so he dropped much lower. And you don’t want to make friends with him anyway, because he is too nice and genuine and soft-spoken, which combined makes him a terrible self-promoter. Thatpaleoguy, aka Jamie Scott, is way down there. He’s very smart and is a funny dude, but he will not help you get customers or book sales. And he doesn’t live in the US, which makes it MUCH harder to use him for networking purposes.

Step 2: “Use” social media

Why is that in quotes? Well…there’s “using social media” and “USING social media”. The one in caps seems like this to me: post things on twitter and facebook every day. Repost things from your archives. If you don’t have something new or creative to tweet, retweet a bunch of shit. A little disclaimer: if I were trying to make a living by being a nutrition coach or author, I’d probably do the same thing :)

Step 3: Don’t get too sciencey or controversial

First off, don’t write posts like this one. Also, don’t get too into complex issues. You know that online battle between Stephan Guyenet and Peter from Hyperlipid? Or Guyenet v. Taubes? Or Lustig v. Everyone? Total waste of time. You gotta spend that time marketing yourself. This only half-joking though, because your target market is just trying to get healthy and maybe lose some weight. They don’t care so much about Neuropeptide Y or Glucagon-Like Peptides. On the flip side, this means you’re likely not bringing anything new to the table. Maybe a mishmash of recipes and paleo guides. So I guess you pick your target: helping the average Joe or informing the curious already-paleos.

Step 4: Don’t ever, ever say you don’t know

You can’t put stuff like this into your book “I haven’t done a systematic review of the effect of omega-6 on autoimmune disease, but I suspect that for some people this may be an issue.” Or “Perhaps, for some people, this may aid weight loss. But for most, weight loss is complex and prone to failure, and even paleo dieting may fail.” You have to sound like you know what you’re doing. Don’t show weakness–you’ll get killed in the Octagon. Personally, I’m a fan of books that cite every single thing, and not just with a reference list at the end. The mass media doesn’t like that kind of thing, so it won’t help book sales.

Step 5: This is not a step, but a gratuitous list of non-marketing smart nutrition bloggers

If you’ve been “paleo” for a while, your thirst for knowledge might take you out of the mass-market territory and into the subtle and technical territory. My first online exposure to paleo, in 2007, was to Big Daddy Sisson and Chris Masterjohn. While Sisson can market for sure, he is smart as hell and has churned out an amazing amount of helpful information. And is anyone really smarter than Masterjohn?

Well, these three guys are right up there: Paul Jaminet, Prof. Dr. Andro, and Lucas Tafur.  In case I somehow get called out for not listing any women, let me say that Melissa McEwen’s site is loaded with practical info, science, and social observation.  And obviously Denise Minger with her insightful study tear-downs.

Even though Jaminet has a book, and Denise will have a book, I’ll just say it flat out: the most interesting blogs are from people who market themselves very little or not at all. That’s just the nature of the beast, since they address different audiences and can blog about whatever the hell they want to blog about. For more information about this post, please check out my linkedin profile. (kidding! how dumb is linkedin?)

Domino’s Gluten-Free Pizza: The Crust That Launched 1,000 Ships

29 May

We here at Highbrow are pretty understanding people. For example, if you accidentally stepped on our toes we’d probably be okay with it, and take it all in stride. Similarly, we understand if you had some serious pizza cravings from time to time. Heck, we all do. Most likely this stemmed from those rascally Ninja Turtles from our youth.

But this isn’t a post about why you still crave pizza. It’s a post about how to stave those cravings by eating the closest representative to real (good) pizza available. You’ve got a few options, really: you could a) make a meatza, b) use a mushroom crust, c) try out a frozen gluten-free crust, or d) fork out some dough (ha!) to try out one of the new gluten-free pizzas from Domino’s. And for your reading pleasure, two Highbrowers made the ultimate sacrifice and ate some Domino’s pizza so they could tell you about it. They’re heroes. Science heroes.

Russ:

I ordered a ham, pepperoni, mushroom, and black olive pizza. First of all, I should mention that these little buggers aren’t cheap – this pie cost me nearly $12. It is definitely small – I plowed through my 10″ in just a few minutes, and ate half of another and still wasn’t full. The taste isn’t bad, just like your average takeout pizza, which is exactly what I was both expecting and hoping for.

Texture was not great. The bottom crust was very well baked (nearly over baked) and the outer crust was really crunchy (vice “crispy”). Meanwhile, the upper part of the crust (that was touching the tomato sauce) was slightly gooey. The transition from the gooey to the crunchy made a little “squeak” sound with my teeth which I hate (literally gives me the chills – I’ve had the same experience with the Udi’s frozen GF crusts).

The whole experience wasn’t bad, and taste won over any texture issues I may have had. My wife and son didn’t notice anything wrong with the texture other than the crunchiness of the crust, which they didn’t really mind. No ill health effects afterwards.


weird crust – crunchy bottom, squishy top

Kamal:

Over on this website called “Facebook”, I spied that a certain Russ Crandall had just ordered a gluten-free pizza from Domino’s, and had reviewed the crustlational properties of his pizza. That was all the excuse I needed. At 11PM on Sunday, having already eaten dinner and dessert, I ordered a gluten-free pizza with bacon, feta, and mushrooms. From some internet browsing, I found that the crust was made of “rice flour, rice starch, potato starch and olive oil”, amongst other ingredients.

The crust was quite sweet. It tasted very slightly burnt, but not in a bad way. I love variety, and having never had a non-frozen gluten-free crust, I was loving it! You see, having lived in Chicago for several years, I liked to rotate my pan pizza with deep dish, and throw in some thin crust or calzone-action at times. So I actually enjoyed this gluten free crust moreso than the normal crust, just because the odd texture and sweetness was a change of pace.

Now for the bad. I already ate dinner and dessert, so this post-dessert pizza wrecked some extra havoc on the gut. Anecdotally, some people’s tummies seem to disagree with gluten-free pizza (Is it the wheat flour substitutes? Is it gluten cross-contamination? What about the veggie oils and toppings? Or…is it…the guilt??) I ended up being extremely full, while watching John Travolta eat at a diner with Uma Thurman on TV. Uma ordered a five dollar shake, and Steve Buscemi was the waiter? I couldn’t pay attention…would my grumbling tummy hold up? Was I entering puke city…in the name of science?

Luckily, all was well in the in the intestinal world the next morning, so no harm no foul my gluten-free friend. I may order you again. (PS: If you haven’t ordered Domino’s online…it is AWESOME! You can watch a cute animation of your pizza being made, and send notes of encouragement to the pizzamakers.)

Verdict

If you have celiac, or just have really bad reactions to gluten, please don’t order this pizza. Domino’s makes sure to warn you right as you select the gluten-free crust what you’re getting into:

Now for everybody else. I know you’ve been perplexed at least once before, when you’ve got the munchies and are not in the mood to intermittently fast or cook anything at all. In that case, might as well try one of these bad boys. You can order it without cheese if casein gives you gut bombs, or order without tomato sauce if nightshades don’t float your boat. The ingredients might not be organic and locally sourced, but this pizza ranks higher than many other junky foods you might turn to for a binge. Consider this a wake up call, national pizza chains. If you don’t step up your gluten-free offerings, Domino’s will crush you. (at least among the tens? hundreds? of thousands of paleo / gluten-free eaters) The gauntlet has been thrown.

Weekly Round Up

7 May

All the whatever we tossed out in our optimized discussion group.

Paleo fast food wrap. Won’t tell you what’s in it or who ate it.

One of our members finds that high dose supplemental D3 helps tremendously to manage her asthma symptoms. Recently she added a supplement called astaxanthin at 4mg a day. Taking this dose she seems to be able to taper down her D3 whilst continuing to enjoy normal breathing! N=1.

The connection between sleeping and keeping slim. 

The price of obesity by the numbers.

Some claim fructose is the best liver energizer, while other say that it depletes cellular energy. 

The ethics of cheaply raised meat. 

Maybe cruises, especially ones claiming they are focused on diet and wellness, aren’t the best things for out waistlines. 

High levels of beta carotene in new news again. Very high levels may be dangerous. Too bad everything is fortified with it!

Julie’s chicken legs and kale. 

Dandelion is one powerful weed. 

A gorgeous sounding pate recipe!

Jenny’s pretty ferment.

More on lack of sleep and body mass: twin study.  

Interesting facts about flavour. 

Is jogging #chroniccardio? Science says it may prolong life.

If your bacon or cured meat “looks somewhat like those greenish glow on the back of the sh*t flies” maybe think twice before eating it. 

Making cocktails with kombucha may not be a great mix. 

Julie’s farmer’s market booty

Paleo can help you raise your kids to be remarkable? 

Perhaps soaking in ice water isn’t the only way to activate cold receptors.

Fructose and omega-6 packed foods may not all be the devil. 

GMO corn and obesity connection. 

More on bad Beta Carotene and its connection to leptin resistance. 

In France, eating is taught and palates are educated. 

Are humans still evolving like animals in the wild?

The protective effect of smoking?  

Congrats on the new house Julia! Nice celebratory bison ribs.

Highbrow Cook Off II: Electric Boogaloo

6 May

Welcome back to our second of however many Highbrow Cook Offs (not to be confused with Iron Chef™ which is property of the Food Network™).  This month we chose ground meat as the special ingredient, with three veggies of different colors and one optional starch.  You can read about some of the other restrictions in our first Iron Chef Cook Off post here.  We are allowed the use of any three herbs and spices, excluding salt and pepper, and unlimited pantry items that we had previously agreed upon.  I loved how creative and diverse all of the entries were.  Let us know if you make any of our recipes at home and how they turned out, and stay in touch because HBP is opening this shit storm up to the public now.  Next months ingredient will be revealed in a couple of weeks, but here is a hint: hike up your big boots and get your digging gloves out (whatever a digging glove is).  But enough of that! Let us live in the moment, and bask in the glow of some ground up meat! Allez Cuisine!

Russ Crandall from The Domestic Man

Russian Cabbage Rolls (Голубцы)

You’ll Need:
2 lbs ground beef
1 cup cooked rice
1 head cabbage
1 onion, chopped finely
6 cloves garlic, chopped finely
2 carrots, shredded (1/2 cup)
1 tsp each salt, pepper, dried dill, prepared mustard
1 14oz can of tomato sauce
8 tbsp butter or ghee
additional 1/2 tsp pepper

Chop the onion finely and set aside. Garlic too. Warm 4 tbsp of the butter or ghee on medium heat for a couple minutes, then add the onion and sauté for about 10 minutes, until the onion is aromatic and translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for another minute, then add the ground beef, salt, pepper, dill, and mustard. Continue to cook until most of the pink has been cooked out of the beef. Add the cooked rice and carrot. Remove from heat and set aside as you work on your cabbage.

Cut out the core of the cabbage. Bring a stockpot half-full of water to a boil on high heat. Drop the cabbage into the boiling water and press it down with the end of a wooden spoon. Hold it there for five minutes, until the cabbage softens. Pull the cabbage out of the water (I used two forks) and let it drain in a colander for a minute, but keep the water boiling. Peel off the leaves. If you get further down the cabbage and the leaves are hard and dry, drop the cabbage into the water for a few more minutes and repeat the process.

Place the cabbage on a cutting board and cut the spine out of it. Put a spoonful of the filling into some cabbage and roll it together. There’s no foolproof way to do this, especially since the cabbage will be in various sizes and thicknesses; just put the filling near one end and roll it up toward the other end. Easy, right? You should be able to make about 18 cabbage rolls.

Place all the rolls in a casserole dish. In the meantime, heat the other 4 tbsp of butter or ghee in a saucepan for a minute or so, then add the tomato sauce and another 1/2 tsp of pepper, stir it together, and reduce the neat to med/low. Simmer the sauce for about five minutes. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Spoon the sauce over the cabbage rolls, and bake everything for 45 minutes.

Overall cost (assuming $6/lb for beef): $22 for six servings.

Amanda Kate Donovan

Harina ~ Moroccan Soup

Harina is a well-known Moroccan soup that is typically served to break fast during the Ramadan holy month. There are a million and one ways to make this soup, though traditionally it is made with orzo, vermicelli, lentils, beans and/or chickpeas. I have made some slight modifications to make this flavorful, rich soup paleo and Perfect Health Diet friendly, and so it’s a quick and simple meal for a busy family. This is a great way to use up a bunch of chicken stock, and is the perfect soup to make when you’re sick. Ras-el-hanout is an arabic spice blend that is becoming easier to find. It will vary quite a bit, but generally is a mixture of turmeric, cinnamon, coriander, nutmeg, cardamom, and cloves.

1# ground lamb (or beef, just not pork)
ghee
olive oil
1 large yellow onion, minced
1T ras-el-hanout
1tsp grated fresh ginger
pinch of cayenne or de arbol chile powder
7c chicken stock
1 large can stewed tomatoes
1c white rice
1/2c cilantro, minced
1/4c parsley, minced

Brown the lamb in 1T each EVOO and ghee in a dutch oven. Add one minced onion and the spices and cook until the onions are translucent. Add about 5 cups of chicken stock and bring to a rolling boil. Turn down to a simmer, and make your rice. I used short grain white rice, cooked in chicken broth and a bit of ghee.

In a small pan, add a tablespoon or two of chicken stock, almost all of the cilantro and parsley (reserving a bit for garnish), and your tomatoes. Cook for 10 minutes or so, and add tomato mixture to the soup. Add in the cooked rice and allow to simmer on low until the soup has thickened up a bit and the flavors have blended. Taste for seasoning, and serve with lemon wedges.

Meredith Harbour Yetter ~ Goose Mortadella

I think I have disqualified myself due to the complexity of this frigging recipe, but I had 2 geese in the freezer that had to be addressed before the next hunting season. I followed this recipe from Hank Shaw at Hunter Gardener Angler Cook.

However to fit it to my tastes/ingredient availability I didn’t add any rendered fat, I used pork cheek for the pork fat, so there was a little pork meat in there, but it was about 98% fat, I didn’t use dry milk or sugar at all or instacure 1, For spices I used corinader, dried chipotle powder and black pepper. I did use some salt as well. I also blended some dried wild morels and added them to hopefully replace whatever binding the milk powder is supposed to do.

I counted the morels as a veggie and just slapped the slices of salami onto some grassfed heirloom tomato and cucumbers. Wah-la!

Julie Barnard from Paleo Republic

Polpette di carne e zucchini

1lb ground beef, 80/20
1/2lb Sweet Italian sausage
1/4c finely chopped fresh parsley – hold a pinch back to use with the zucchini
1/4c finely chopped ramps – hold a pinch back to use with the zucchini *note: can substitute scallion, shallot, or chive
A few pinches of salt
Several grinds of pepper
3c tomato sauce, warmed on the stove
3 zucchini, sliced thinly
8×8 baking dish

Oven to 450

Combine ground beef, sausage, parsley, ramps, salt, pepper, and mix by hand until all ingredients are fully combined.

Roll the mixture into round meatballs about 1-1/2” and place into the baking dish. It’s totally cool if they’re touching.

Roast for 20 minutes, remove from the oven and very carefully drain some of the grease that has accumulated in the pan.

Pour the heated sauce over the meatballs and return to the oven and roast for another 15 minutes.

While the meatballs are finishing in the oven take a mandolin, sharp knife, or vegetable peeler and thinly slice the zucchini into ribbons. You can quickly steam them but the heat from the sauce and meatballs warms the zucchini up nicely I’ve found, so my preference is raw. Toss with the saved pinches of parsley and ramps.

Remove the meatballs from the oven. Plate the zucchini ribbons and top with the meatballs and sauce.

Serves 2-3

Bree Milne from Real Life

Bahn Mi Lettuce Wraps

I have been craving Bahn Mi lately.  And I’m usually not one to deny cravings, but the best Bahn Mi that I have ever had was at a small little asian grocery store in Prince Rupert, BC.  And since I don’t live there anymore, and it’s quite a ways out of the way to go for a sandwich, I just haven’t done it.  But – lately I had been thinking that I could do it, I could make a pretty good Bahn Mi if I tried.  So here’s my try – a la Paleo!

Do Chua

  • 1 large carrot cut in matchstick pieces
  • 1 daikon cut in matchstick pieces
  • 2-3 tsp sea salt
  • 1.5 cups rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 cup warm water

Place the daikon and carrots in a colander.  Sprinkle salt all over them and mix with your hands for 2-3 minutes.  Quite a bit of juice should come off the carrots and daikon, and they should become soft.  Rinse them off lightly (or not at all if you like salty food).  Pack them into glass jars.  In a separate container combine the vinegar, warm water and maple syrup (you can use more or less maple syrup depending on your taste for sweet – or omit it completely).  Add the liquid to the veggies.  Seal the jar and put it in the fridge.  I let mine sit for 2 days before I used them and they were great.

Part Two:

  • 1 kg (~2lbs) ground pork + 1 minced/ground pork liver
  • 6 garlic cloves – minced
  • 6 green onions – chopped
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp sriracha
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tsp fresh ground pepper
  • lard (I used duck fat – cuz that’s how I roll)

Pre heat oven to 350F.  Take your rings off – put all ingredients in a big bowl and combine with your hands.  Then roll into meatballs.  Pan fry on medium heat until goldeny brown all around (about 5 minutes per side).  Place on a  tinfoiled cookie sheet and bake for 15 minutes.

To Assemble:

Ingredients

  • 1 head of lettuce (I used iceberg)
  • Do chua
  • meatballs

Put them all together!  Be a touch careful – the lettuce is a bit finnicky.  And eat!  Enjoy!

Matthew Dalby from The Call of the Honey Guide

Onion, carrot, leek, potato and mackerel

We don’t have a recipe for this one, but I think it’s pretty self explanatory.  And, this is our only fishy entry.  Wallah!

Carly Caller

Cottage Pie

For the Filling

1 knob of butter
1 large onion
3 medium carrots
3 sticks of celery
1 tsp Turmeric
600g of ground beef (mince beef to ma UK homeboyz)
400g of passata (blended tomatoes in a carton)
400g of beef stock
Salt and Pepper

For the Potato MashTopping

5 large potatoes
Butter to taste ( I use nearly half a pack)
Salt and Pepper

Method -

Preheat oven to gas mark 4, (or the equivalent) I keep my oven dish in the oven while preheating. I’m not sure why. Just do it.
Chop finely your onion, carrots and celery
Melt your butter in a large saucepan, fry on a low heat finely chopped veg with the tsp of turmeric, (simply because I put turmeric in to damn near everything, cos I can) for about 10 mintues, or until soft
Add ground beef, turn up heat to meduim, keep mixing the um… mixture, until meat is browned, add your passata and your beef stock, season well and bring to a boil
Once bubbling, turn down heat to low and simmer for at least 20 minutes until mixture is thick and glossy

Meanwhile, peel and boil your potatoes until soft, not too long though or the potatoes will absorb too much of the water and your topping will just be a layer of slop. Not nice. Once potatoes have boiled, drain and mix in a crapload of butter and salt and black pepper to taste, mash into a nice thick, creamy, buttery, fluffy, mashy goodness. Try not to eat. Yet.

Take your largish dish out the oven, wear oven gloves. It helps, trust me. I use a ceramic dish. I have used glass and that black bakeware stuff I can’t remember the name of, both work fine too. Just use any oven proof dish, in an oven. I digress..

Pour your now reduced, and thicked mince mixture into your oven dish and spoon the mash mixture on top, using a fork to spread the mash. Bake in the oven for about 40-50 mins, or untill browning and crispy. As you can see from my picture, I like mine, almost cremated, but you can keep an eye on yours, and just take it out when you think it looks right. All the lovely butter in the mash will give for a nice crispy topping. Sometimes I’ll even grate chedder cheese (reccommened) on top for the last ten minutes, but I kept this one “clean” for the benefit of the cook off.

Serve with your choice of vegetable. This is of course optional.

Eat.

Weekly Round Up

30 Apr

Topics, links and comments from this week’s HBP discussions.

Jan's favorite fish.

Avocado oil may improve blood lipids.

The liver tells all and reveals much about fat.

How many calories to you burn using a standing desk? 

A Paleo food truck is in the works. Show your support people!

Russ's pho!

Fatty food’s link to marital stress?  Of course we’ve seen just the opposite here. 

A nice submission to the NY Times’ Ethical Meat Eating contest.

Helminths for allergic rhinitis.

Screwing up the environment is Paleo. Or at least we’ve been doing it for a very long time. 

Another rebuttal to the latest anti-meat arguments.

Interesting connection between niacin and obesity.  Paul Jaminet adds to the discussion here. 

Derrick's hardcore stew of beef bones, beef heart, assorted shellfish, bone stock and other thangs.

Men’s grooming products can be pretty uncomfortable. 

Fasting’s beneficial effects on cancer treatment.

Round 2 of HBP -Cook-off closes Friday, May 4th. The rules are as follows:  Protein: ground meat (does not have to be beef) 3 veggies: three different colors, starch is up to you if you choose to do one or not – also totally open, rice, potato – safe starches! 3 Spices only. More here.

Results of Biggest Loser regimen on participants’ metabolisms.

How vegetable oils replaced animal fats.

Julia's San Diego trip featured some tasty food.

The mental effects of supplementing with DHA alone.

Chocolate has many special benefits- science says so!

 Chris Kresser continues with his salt series. 

Get your Gluten Free Coconut Cake recipe here!

Mash's Saturday night spread.

Weekly Round Up

23 Apr

Here’s a recap of links and photos from the HBP discussion group. (Note: Meredith is fully aware that “Roundup” can be used as one word but separated it into two the first time she used it on this blog. Therefore she is stubbornly sticking to this incorrect version. Suck it if you don’t like it!).

Dennis has some nice purple kraut going!

Thanks to Pat (@nutritionator) Highbrow Paleo has a newspaper based on some #Paleo tweets. It’s a neato idea and you, YES YOU can subscribe if you’d like.

Supplement with red meat for your health.

Paleo Republic has nearly all your Paleo food ideas covered (except for thedomesticman.com). Check out this meatza.

It’s been badmouthed for years, but caffeine is making a comeback. So many interesting uses – treating dry eyes for example.

Some members are tackling this list of 45 foods to never buy again but dreaming up Paleo versions.

Light pollution is now considered as carcinogenic as smoking.

Julia's egg salad, Bubbies pickle, some local bacon & U.S. Wellness liverwurst

Superhuman Radio interviews Loren Cordain.

Should kids go vegan? 

Who else out there is having this issue? Lately our bulk turmeric is VERY dark. And this is from those of us who live on totally different sides of the US. Some think it's a soil PH think other attribute it to copper. Anyone else seeing this?

J. Stanton gives us something more to think about in terms of food reward.

Ancestral Momentum tackles the controversial (who knew??) subject of cold thermogenesis. 

Need a cookbook devoted to insect recipes?

Our buddy Tony was on Low Carb Conversations, a Jimmy Moore podcast.

The diet world is getting weird, or weirder.

Cholesterol just may be the thing to help us fight cancer.  

People who eat a lot of flavanoids, particularly blueberries, have lower rates of diabetes and mortality and they raise adiponectin levels. Hear more here.

Aspirin increases AMPK.

What’s crazier: eating plants and animals (aka “paleo”) or eating beaver anal gland secretions?

Russ's lettuce chips.

Another variable to add to the pointless chase for eternal life we are all compelled to partake in.

Why are Asian rice eaters thin? 

Shift work and diabetes.

Hunger and it’s ability to help partition your calories where they need to go – away from fat and into lean tissue.

Stabby’s Corner (direct quotes from the Raccoon itself in response to this article about science failing us):

 “The scientific method is great, it is just that when there’s lots of money involved it kind of disappears out the window. Clinical trials are great and teach us a lot, and people just need to have a view of the context of things. There are too many myopic specialists and not enough generalists to put the whole picture together.

I think that a bunch of passionate people who can read and think without bias, like Highbrow Paleo, yay, is the best way to use science to get to the truth of the matter. Couldn’t we slash cardiovascular risks using science if we came up with recommendations? I’d like to hope so.

Most epidemiology should just restract itself and go home. Give the money to people who are going to do clinical trials that are smartly conducted and based in evidence.”

Carly's wild smoked salmon fillet with ginger, garlic, lime, gf soy sauce and chilli flakes, kale pan fried in butter and rice with butter. :)

Weekly Round Up

16 Apr

We got all discussy this past week. Here are some links and food photos to whet your appetites!

Jan's Finnish whitefish caviar with shitakes.

Higher levels of PCBs in organic milk when compared to conventional milk.

Underground Wellness featured Dr. Tery Wahls.

Shift work and it’s effects on diabetes risk. 

Coffee’s effects on adipokines, liver function, triglycerides and LDL.

Connection between blood levels of some of the phthalates and increased prevalence of diabetes, even after adjusting for obesity, blood lipids, smoking, and exercise habits.

Vitacost promotes “eating like a caveman” in their latest newsletter!

Jan wins "Mr. Paleo 2012".

Chris Kresser tackles salt in his latest series of blog posts.

Riiiiight. The obesity epidemic is a simple math problem!

Mel HGL serves up a post that covers the traditional use of cold therapy.

Perhaps the best weight loss article ever written?

Humans apparently evolved the ability to produce omega 3 and 6 fats to feed our brainz. But in today’s world this may serve as a mismatch and is prolly royally screwing us up!

Chronic dieting isn’t doing very much good for our waste lines.

Russ's colcannon with just a smidge too many leeks - but he thinks onions are gross anyway.

Paindatabase.com urges us to stop all the negative thinking!

Fecal transplants may sound downright horrid, but if you’ve got a case of C. diff you just may want to seek out a healthy poo donor.

The BBC covers the revival of fermenting foods.

Jarred baby food is pretty devoid of nutrients. 

Honey’s effect on human evolution.

FED features a comprehensive post about the merits of cooking in human evolution.  

Notes from Andrew,  our resident Bastyr Doctor of Naturopathic medicine student:

  •  Chamomile (matricaria recuita) is kind of amazing. It’s the most potent herbal nervine known. It contains matricine which get converted in the gut to chamazulene. Chamazulene powerfully stops the conversation of arachidonic acid (a major source of oxidation) and inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (think low, low dose aspirin). Chamomile alo contains apigenin which reduces DNA oxidation, is chemoprotective, and induces apoptosis. Squiterpense give chamomile it’s bitter taste which stimulate cranial nerve 9 and 10 causing an increasing in stomach acid, salivation, and peristalsis. Many of these benefits are in the volatile oils of chamomile so teas must be covered as they steep otherwise the volatile oils will evaporate. If your chamomile isn’t slightly bitter, find a brand that hasn’t bred the medicinal qualities out of their chamomile.
  • Also, how to make the computer less addicting at night. control + option + command + 8 Try it out.

Jenny decided that Saturday nights are perfect for boning.

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